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Carlton II

Named by the Suffolk Wildlife Trust as he was tagged at Carlton Marshes in Lowestoft, part of the beautiful Suffolk Broads and a nature reserve managed by the Trust.

Carlton II the Cuckoo
Status:
Active
Tagged:
Saturday, May 12, 2018 - 08:00
Tagging Location:
Carlton Marshes, Suffolk Broads
Sex:
Male
Age when found:
Over one year
Satellite Tag No.:
50026
Wing Length (mm):
225

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Carlton II's journey from 01 May 2020 to 25 September 2020

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Carlton II's movements

18 Sep 2020 - Carlton II moves east into Mali

New updates received yesterday evening show that Carlton II has started the next leg of his journey which will take him east from his stop-over location in Senegal, towards Nigeria. By yesterday evening he had flown 748 km (465 miles) south east from his last location in Senegal, over the border into Mali and was 43 km (27 miles) north west of the capital of Bamako. It is the rainy season in southern Mali at the moment and today in Bamako it is approximately 30°C (86°F) with 60% probability of thunderstorms. 

07 Sep 2020 - Carlton II arrives in Senegal

New updates received yesterday morning show that Carlton II has continued south over the border from Mauritania into Senegal where he also stopped off in 2018 and 2019. He is now in northern Senegal, approximately 86 km (54 miles) south of the Mauritanian border, close to the Reserve Sylvo-Pastorale de Rhadar. In previous years his stop overs in Senegal have been a few hundred kilometers further south. On this day in 2018, Carlton II was already well on his way east and had reached Benin, almost 2,000km from his stop-over in Senegal. Last year he spent time in southern Mali, remaining here until late September before moving east. 

04 Sep 2020 - Carlton II has reached Mauritania

New updates received early this morning show that Carlton II has flown a further 1,173 km (730 miles) south, bringing him inland over Western Sahara. By 06:33 this morning he had reached the Trarza region of southwest Mauritania and was 223 km (139 miles) east of the capital Nouakchott. Given that Mauritania is largely desert we expect Carlton II to continue his journey south a few hundred kilometers more before stopping over, perhaps in Senegal. 

03 Sep 2020 - Carlton II speeding south

Carlton II has taken advantage of favourable winds to make rapid progress south from his last location off the coast of northern Portugal. Between 23:01 on Tuesday 1 September and 20:00 on Wednesday 2 September he flew 1,442 km (896 miles) south, staying out to sea the whole time and clocking up an impressive average speed of 69 kmh (43 mph). This journey has taken him to a new position off the coast of southern Morocco. The latest update showed him between Lanzarote and Morocco, approximately 150 km due east of Lanzarote and 87 km from the coast of south west Morocco. Will he now make landfall in Morocco or press on across the Sahara?  

02 Sep 2020 - Carlton II is finally on the move

Having been sitting in north western Spain since 8 August, it was a relief to log on this morning and see that Carlton II is finally on the move south. It looks as if he set off at around 20:30 yesterday evening (1 September), flew around Satiago de Compostela and by the time the last update came in at 23:01 last night, he was 14.5 km (9 miles) offshore from north western Portugal, approaching Viana do Castelo. In 2018 he left northern Spain on 6 August and last year he departed on 28 July. In both previous years he has stopped off in Senegal after crossing the Sahara. Will Carlton II be in Africa when we next hear from him? Stay tuned to find out...

Past updates from Carlton_ii

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